Tag: Weltur

Spiney Leaves, Berries, and a Light Leak

I decided to send the Welta Weltur our for a bit of a CLA.  The rangefinder / viewer is a bit foggy and makes it difficult to focus easily.  That is taken care of by using a smaller f-stop, thus increasing the DOF.  I am not sure how this light leak occurred – perhaps when it was being developed.

Taken with Ilford XP Super 400, Welta Weltur from 1937, Xenar lens.  Guestimated exposures.  Scanned with Epson V600.

Tra-La-La Along the Garden Path

Another view of the local botanical gardens.  Today’s image is much sharper than yesterday’s – less muddy from a bit of blur.  Again, Weltur, Ilford, and Xenar.

It seems the Xenar is quite good at handling contrast.  The LR historgram shows both in its display.  As well, the Epson V600 handles C-41 processed B&W film with Digital Ice – very little clean up done in post.  With one roll of the XP Super film left, I am tempted to get some more . . .

Canyon Oak

A tree, a sunny day, a canyon, a 1937 folding Welta Weltur camera, a colored filter, 120 film shot in6x4.5 film, Ilford film, a Schneider Kreuznach Xenar 2.8 80mm lens.  Such a delight to get back from the lab (even if I have to do a bit of cleaning up in LR)!

If you look closely, you will see there is blur in the image.  I finally figured out that the way I was pressing the exposure button was the fault.  I did it too quickly, and the result was a sort of little jerk.  Motion and blur.  That is why some pictures from this roll are sharper and others softer.  Interesting how you have to really think about things differently depending on the camera you are using.

In the Park

Another image from the roll of Ilford Super XP 400, a C-41 process black and white film.  Again, with the Welta Weltur from 1937.  And, once more, I am so impressed by the Xenar lens!

I took the Weltur out in a number of situations, using the Sunny 16 rule for the most part.  I expect I shot this at 1/250 as it was a bright, sunny day.  I also brought my light meter with me, but tried to guess before I measured.  I also think I may have used f/8.  The reason?  More light for the detail in the trunk.  Maybe I should write things down so I can see how things really work out – not just guess at how things work out.  Shouldn’t be too hard for 12 – 18 pictures!

Sage

This time around I remembered I had the reduction mask in my 1937 Welta Weltur camera.  I also used a yellow(ish) filter I have that slides over the lens.  I have never used it before, but I am glad I did as it made the plants a bit more differentiated.  In theory, I get how filters work, but when I try to remember, it just disappears from my brain.  One day it would be really nice to get that clearly imprinted in my memory!

Okay, that aside, I so enjoy making pictures with these old cameras.  When they hit the sweet spot, there is something so beautiful in the final image.  This one I cleaned up – threads, spots – but didn’t do too much more to it other than upping the contrast a bit.  I wanted the white sage flowers to pop against the background.  The filter helped, but so did digital post production.

I know some people who claim that digital post is not the same as a real dark room.  No, it’s not, but it is a lot easier to do the same things – and then some! – you would do in a traditional dark room.

Anyway, more to come, but perhaps only a couple as a lot of the images are a bit dicey as far as putting out in the public’s eye.  I scanned these with the Epson V600 scanner and the film is Ilford Super XP 400, which is a black and white that can be developed in C-41, which is the chemistry for color negative film.

Waiting for Lovers . . . and some notes on On1 Photo Raw

waiting-for-lovers
Waiting for Lovers

Today is the very, very first day that On1 Photo Raw is available for usage.  I think the original idea was to have a product ready to roll in October 2016, but rather than have a “finished” product full of bugs, they realized they had more on their plate, and held off until today, November 23.  I’m glad they did – and I am glad, too, that they realize that this really is a “work in progress” as it stands.

Personally, I love On1, and have been using them since version 8, which was a while back.  I use it with Lightroom.  What makes On1 great as a company is their support, ongoing consistent development, tutorials, and so on.  On1 products are sophisticated, and while they do not rival Adobe Photoshop for complexity, On1 products are far easier to use.  I prefer their brushes, spot and blemish removal tools, as well as the fact I can create presets which I can store.  At this point, the presets from On1 Photo Suite 10 cannot be used in On1 Photo Raw, but I expect they will have the ability to port them later on.  The one-up that Photoshop has is its “content-aware” fill.

The image above, Waiting for Lovers, was edited using On1 Photo Raw.  It is a film image using Kodak Ektar 100 in a 1930s Welta Weltur rangefinder.  The lens is an uncoated Xenar – probably about 75mm – which has an ethereal quality to it that I really love.  Scanning the image with my rather dirty Epson V600 (I have since cleaned it), I ended up with a blue streak across the entire image.  On1 took it out quite nicely.  Spots and threads were also easy to remove.  I think On1 did something to their processing algorithm (or whatever), as the spot removal works very quickly.

chumash-trail-1

This image is a pano stitched together in LR, and consists of two images taken with the Olympus XA4 and Lomography 100 film.  The only thing I did was perk it up a bit with some detail, in LR and in Photo Raw.  It is nearly identical to the SOOC image.

orchid-in-the-window

Finally, the above image was really pushed in On1 Photo Raw.  Spot removal, brush usage, presets, whatever.  This was an overall high-key, pale image, but I set it up to be contrasty and bright – possibly too much so – but wanted see what I could do.  This was also taken with the XA4 and Lomo 100 film.  Both of these two images were scanned using a Pakon 135 scanner.

There is so much software out there for photographers, that competitors to Photoshop seem to come and go.  My favorite and most consistent programs are Lightroom and On1.  I also use DxO v. 11, and while it is good for some things, it lacks the diversity of On1.  Capture One is good, too, but it makes me crazy as it does not make sense to me at times . . . but I admit, I have not put in time to using it as it has a higher learning curve, and is not, for me, very intuitive.  So, two thumbs up to On1 for its Photo Raw software – I think it will prove to be a real winner as they continue to develop it.

Sage & Pine

Sage & Pine

Another cross-processed and rescued Velvia image . . . absolutely hideous in CP and barely salvageable in b&w!  What’s a girl to do?  The camera, though, does a fine job when the user doesn’t mess up.  The lens is a Xenar, uncoated, which gives it a particularly vintage quality that modern digital do not have.

Open Space

Open Space

Taken with Velvia 100 film in a pre-WW2 Welta Weltur folder, 6×4.5.  While out with the camera, it popped open twice – I had jerry-rigged a strap for it but if obviously didn’t work too well!  The film was processed in C41 as a result at the local photo shop – to pay more for slide film and potentially nothing seemed ridiculous – so it was cross-processed.  I was quite pleased to see a few out of the 16 survived.  A bit of work made this picture salvageable.  Below is the original cross-processed image, and then a variant in black and white.

Open Space - OriginalOpen Space - Black & White