Tag: Tri-X 400

Wine Country, Paso Robles

Wine Country, Paso Robes

This is from a summer or two ago. We drove along Hwy 49 in the central coastal area of California. It is a lovely drive – quite unpopulated in many ways. The hills and valleys spread out on either side of the road, with trees dotting the grassy slopes. Grapes are grown here, and the Paso Robles area is known for its wines. If you take some of the side roads off the highway, which is a nicely paved two-lane roadway, you can find yourself under the canopy of old oak trees, deep in the gloom of shade on a bright summer’s day.

Zeiss Ikon Ikonta, Tri-X 400 by Kodak. Scanned and processed with Epson V600, VueScan, and Negative Lab Pro.

A Tunnel of Trees

A Tunnel of Trees

Out I wandered with my long-lusted-for Nikon 50mm f1.2 AI-S lens attached for long-lusted-for Nikon FM3a. A maiden voyage for the lens with film.

The film was Kodak Tri-X 400, shot at 1600, and supposedly processed at +2 at the lab. Did they do it? No idea! I just have to trust they did – I think they did, though, because the images are pretty contrasty, which is what I was aiming for. I made them a bit more so in post.

There is a small liberal arts college within a short distance from where I live, and bits of it seem almost like you are in the country, but the truth is, you are not. Still, I like to wander over in that area to enjoy the trees and their canopy of leaves. This is a panorama of 6 photos I merged together.

I linked the photo to my Flickr account, and may start to do that in the future. It will save space on my WordPress site. Also, you can click on the photo and jump to the Flickr site, and from there see the trees in their glorious detail. It really worth it to see these trees (I think, anyway!).

Umbrellas in a Sunny, Dying Mall

Sunbrellas with no one to shelter . . . this is a shot from a dying mall that is under new ownership and new management.

There is a real drive to make this mall work again, but its construction is one of the things working against it. It is open to the sky in the center, which is not the best in an area prone to 90-100F temperatures off and on year round.  Hard surfaces reflecting the heat don’t help, either.  It is a very nice place to shop – and horribly uncomfortable at high noon.

In order to generate revenue, small businesses are moving in because of reasonable rents that once were so high that only large chain stores could afford them.  It is here that I take my film to be processed, that my husband goes to buy grain and beer-making supplies.  I hope that more businesses (obviously, there are more than two) move in, as it is a very pleasant place to shop when it is in the 70s.

And even more, I hope they create more covered spaces to get away from the heat – sweltering heat is unpleasant, for humans and business alike.