Tag: tree

Dark Tree

One thing that I am finding so useful about only doing black and white is contrast – white against black, shape against shape. I am not a particularly analytical person so it takes awhile for what I see to make intellectual sense, such as the visual evidence of light and dark working to create shapes.

Hillside Trees

I have been taking my Yashica D TLR out a lot! Color and black and white film. I am finding it so much fun to use and I seem to be getting better pictures in medium format with this camera than with any of my others, all of which are vintage folders. Composing an image in the Yashica is a lot easier than with a small rangefinder view.

Besides using the Yashica D, I also did a roll of a new (to me) film: Ultrafine Extreme 400. For all 12 images in the roll, I applied the Sunny 16 rule, and nailed the exposures on all of them! As far as focus goes, I think my focus was good for most of them, but I think my scanning is a bit off as the film was rather curly even when I tried to flatten it. I am using an Epson V600 with Vuescan and Negative Lab Pro for this batch, but plan to use a digital camera and light table to scan some negatives as well.

These trees were taken on a hill near my house in the late morning.

Knoll

This little knoll is next to a parking lot, but it was so lovely in the light! I always find it amazing how taking something out of context can make it seem very different than it is. I remember a very good example of this when someone who stayed at what looked like a cozy B&B ended up being right in an industrial area – and an ugly one at that – by showing the advertisement and then the reality.

High Noon and Hope

Sometimes the sun is relentless, heat is oppressive, but today, the fear of wind-whipped fires is no joke. In SoCal it has been a dry summer and fires are raging, not just nearby, but up north. We were awakened this morning to phone calls of closing of schools and potential power shut-offs to prevent further fires. The winds could blow sparks and ignite fires miles away. Let us hope things don’t get to the point of being evacuated – which we have been fortunate to avoid thus far over the years – but off I go in a bit to clean up and to begin sorting out what to take. The wind is about 30-70 mph, depending on where you are, but it is strong enough here, and so filled with dust and ash, that all the windows are closed. The wind I so love is now an enemy.

Dry Creek

“Dry Creek” is a landscaping element popular in drought-ridden and dry climes, especially in the area I live. There is a semblance of a creek created with the use of rocks in a form of path or creek bed. It’s really a pleasant landscaping element. Additionally, the use of xeriscape plantings decreases the need for water once the plants are established. This is taken alongside one of the local library’s walls.