California Poppies

I’m a bit behind on the BW project, but all because of working on the scanning software and getting it to process black and white.  I have a Pakon scanner, which is fab for 35mm film.  I spent a couple of days ironing out and learning the software, as well as applying patches which allow more than color negative and C-41 black and white film.

This is the first image I have gotten back from the developer doing something I have never done before – pushing film.  Mark at If Time Stood Still made a wonderful picture of his youngest daughter, specifically the image called The Lunch Date.  He shot Ilford HP5+ and pushed it.

Using his instructions, I did the same.  The result is really pleasant, and seems to push contrast to level I like.  Since I prefer shorter scaled B&W to longer scale in general, this is a good technique to know.

Mark processes his own film B&W, as well as color, and scans his film, too.  (Altogether, I think he is an amazing photographer, especially of his family.)  Go visit his site!

So, more to follow!

Over the Hills and Far Away

Panoramas allow me to capture the grandeur the vast outdoors has  . . .

There are a number of different programs which do panos, one being a leap from Lightroom to the pano functions of Photoshop, MS ICE (image composition editor), and so on.

Most people do panos in digital.  I like to do it with film, too, as it is a bit of a challenge – and it requires a  bit of thought . . . after all, there is only so much film, far less than the room on an SD card!

And here we are:  A 5-image pano of the poppy fields at the California Poppy Reserve last March, in the 50mph winds.   The middle of the image doesn’t look too bad when smallish, but if you click on it twice, you will see a lot of blur in the center.  Not a fab job, but the job it does is there – it shows you the stunning beauty of the fields.  With less wind, the picture would have been a lot more successful.