Tag: Kodak

Sage in Bloom

Blooming Sage

I took this photo a few years ago with my pre-WW2 Voigtlander Brillant. It is a simple camera that gives lovely results, as only a vinage camera can. I wonder if it is from their uncoated lenses.

I haven’t been to the local botanical gardens since last year, where this picture wast taken, when I fell down a hill and came home looking like something out of a horror film. A bit trepidatious to return, I admit. However, after the rains of last months, I know I have to go. The hills are greening, and the air of spring is in the air.

Definitely time to get out. I think more Ektar is definitely indicated, too.

Take Me Out to the Ball Game

Take Me Out to the Ball Game

I re-scanned some Portra 400 I took in 2015 with my husband’s old Ricoh XR-10 camera from the last century. I have a Pakon 135 scanner that digitizes 35mm film. It is a real life saver, slow, and overall, reliable. There are some quirks that go with it, such as crippled software which I have worked around, but it makes scanning film very easy.

A few days ago, my husband replaced the old hard drive with an SSD in the vintage laptop I use exclusively with the Pakon. He removed the old HD and mirrored it. After that, he used an interface of some variety to make the old machine – an eMachine from 2005?? – running Windows XP (the only software that the Pakon software will work with) – think it is using an old HD. Yeah, techie stuff. So, I needed to see if the Pakon would still work – and it does! Now let’s just hope the old laptop will continue until I die, and the Pakon, too. What is interesting, too, is that my wireless mouse dies and resurrects itself periodically on the eMachine, so I ordered a USB cabled mouse and a USB hub to see if some of the other laptop quirks can be resolved. The laptop has a touchpad, but I don’t like them at all.

Besides checking out the workings of the new HD and the Pakon, I finally got around to seeing how to save the scans as negatives so I can process them using Negative Lab Pro 2.3 and Lightroom Classic. The Neg Lab Pro website gives very good directions – far better than when Nate began the product – and this scan, which you can enlarge on Flickr, shows how nice it all works out. The beauty of the film is still there, even digitized.

I think this combo is a ball hit out of the park! More to come.

Christmas Day

Chapel

The chapel at the local college is a favorite subject of mine. And since today is Christmas, it doesn’t hurt to think and reflect a bit about the holiday, before its commercialism. It is the story of hope – and hope is always something we need, no matter what we believe. It is a day to enjoy our blessings, and a day to reflect and dig deeper than the bottom of your stocking.

Shadow

Shadow

I really do like trees! I admit to a leaning toward deciduous hardwoods, but when I saw this shadow projected onto the building, I realized that one of the things I enjoy about palm trees is just their crazy (to me) appearance. This shadow looks like me on a bad hair day, but for the palm, it is nice and tidy.

Nikon FM3a, 50mm f1.2, and Tri-X. And more to come!

A Tunnel of Trees

A Tunnel of Trees

Out I wandered with my long-lusted-for Nikon 50mm f1.2 AI-S lens attached for long-lusted-for Nikon FM3a. A maiden voyage for the lens with film.

The film was Kodak Tri-X 400, shot at 1600, and supposedly processed at +2 at the lab. Did they do it? No idea! I just have to trust they did – I think they did, though, because the images are pretty contrasty, which is what I was aiming for. I made them a bit more so in post.

There is a small liberal arts college within a short distance from where I live, and bits of it seem almost like you are in the country, but the truth is, you are not. Still, I like to wander over in that area to enjoy the trees and their canopy of leaves. This is a panorama of 6 photos I merged together.

I linked the photo to my Flickr account, and may start to do that in the future. It will save space on my WordPress site. Also, you can click on the photo and jump to the Flickr site, and from there see the trees in their glorious detail. It really worth it to see these trees (I think, anyway!).

Winter Sky (and then some more!)

Besides acquiring a bit of old glass, I have also, as said before, been wandering through my digital archives. Here, a photo taken in March 2017 using the Retina IIIc with the Xenon 50mm f2 lens and Agfa Vista 200. Some images I desaturated to B&W because I thought they looked better that way. Digitalizing film can be quite a good thing!

When I first used this camera, I found it rather trying. It has an EV metering system which made absolutely no sense to me, even after reading the manual. Yes, I do RTFM! However, YouTube came to the rescue once again, and there are several good videos about the Kodak Retinas from the 1950s. Many consider these to be some of the finest Kodak cameras ever produced. I won’t disagree. Nearly every American in my age group has used Kodak cameras, and many were rather cheap and produced rather poor pictures. But, for a kid, they were just perfect!

This camera came to me about 4-5 years ago from Chris Sherlock at Retina Rescue, across the sea in Australia. He’s great. You can find his videos on YouTube. Playing with it again, and having more experience with older cameras. I really appreciate this camera far more than I did before. I think I am going to throw some film in the camera and see what this puppy can do yet again.