Tag: Kodak

Tomatoes in Suburbia

Nothing like a mistake that is rather a fun one – here, double exposure in my Certo Six folding camera. I forgot to advance the film and thought there was an issue, so released the exposure button again by choosing the “bypass” button. (If you have a Certo Six, you know what I am talking about.) It makes me think that it might be a fun exercise to deliberately, rather than accidentally, create double exposures. Maybe even triple. Or quadruple. Such is possible!!

This is with Portra 400, a film I always find way to delicate in color for my taste, but it could be I will change my mind after cataract surgery. This is pretty much SOOC with just some spot removal in post. I don’t like spotty film . . .

Evening Stroll & Random Thoughts

I picked up a roll of film I had processed and ignored scanning it for weeks. Photography just wasn’t interesting anymore. Yesterday I finally scanned it.

This hiatus showed me something very clearly: I prefer the looks of film to that of digital. Even the Fuji digital equivalents don’t come close to the beauty of film. However, in the pre-digital age, film was horrible because it was expensive and unsuccessful as far as I was concerned. Snapshots, bad lighting, poor composition, and more failures than success. And no education, just a camera and failed hope.

Now I think that digital helped me learn and digital helps analog. It’s good when things play well together, don’t you think?

Support

At the end of the Ventura pier, the platform widens out and in the center is an opening. You can look down into the waters below, and see the supports reaching up.

Years ago – maybe 25 – when I lived just a short way from the pier, in the middle of a fierce storm, a friend and I walked out to the end of the pier. The wind was wild, waves were high, we got soaked, we were stupid, we nearly flew off in the wind. The next day it turns out the pier had been severely damaged where we stood. Closed for weeks and weeks, the supports beneath were reinforced and rebuilt.

And now you see them.

North by Northwest

While walking out on the Ventura Pier, I was rather surprised about how empty the beaches were in the middle of summer – until I remembered it was a weekday. Here, the beaches seldom get swamped like you see in some pictures, with people stumbling over each other, but usually there are more people at play. The coronavirus has reached the shores of the Pacific!

Here, looking up the coast as it curves around and heads toward the Rincon and Santa Barbara. There is a boardwalk and bike path that lead to the outlet of the Ventura River. Surfers usually gather at the point where the buildings end, but the tide was out and the sea quiet.