Tag: Kodak Ektar 100

Shadows & Leaves

 

shadows-and-leaves

When I scanned the images from the first roll of film through the Yashica D TLR, I think I scanned them at 3600.  They are BIG!  I wanted to see the details capable of the camera and the lens, and I was honestly really, really pleased.  Here on offer is a portion of a picture I took of leafy plants nestled in the dappled sun beneath an oak tree along the Moonrise Trail.  The Yashinon lens does a superb job altogether.  This is about 1/10 of the original picture.

Trail a la Lomo

Trail a la Lomo

Hmmm.  The images I get back from the photo lab are grungy.  They arrive grungy.  Using the Epson V600, I find crud everywhere.

With this picture, I moved it around on the scanner to decide if it was the neg or the scanner, and the neg won.

I cleaned the image with PEC-12, and the crud disappeared – a bit.

Then different settings in Epson Scan.  Final settings which produced acceptable results were 2400 dpi, 48 bit color, digital ice, and medium unsharp mask.  Final clean up in On1 Photo 10 and LR.  Film was Kodak Ektar 100.

A Touch of Red

A Touch of Red

I went to the local botanical garden last week and tested out Kodak Ektar 100. This is a great film for outdoors! I used the whole roll in the gardens, and am quite pleased with the colors. And the camera. And the lens. I just need to work a bit more on nailing the focus when I use a wide open lens.

At the Top of the Hill

On the Top of the Hill (1 of 1)

The other day I headed out to the local botanical garden with my film camera loaded with Kodak Ektar 100. The goal was twofold. First, I wanted to practice exposure with a film I have never used. Ektar is reputed to be excellent for landscape because of rich colors. The other was to use my 135mm lens, one which is about 50 years old, and to see if it, with the FM2N (the film camera) had accurate focus.

I was pleased with the Ektar. I had it professionally developed and scanned, but I also used the film at home and scanned it as well. And I was pleased with the camera and lens combination, though with a large f/stop, it is a must to be rock steady when exposing.