Tag: ilford

Tra-La-La Along the Garden Path

Another view of the local botanical gardens.  Today’s image is much sharper than yesterday’s – less muddy from a bit of blur.  Again, Weltur, Ilford, and Xenar.

It seems the Xenar is quite good at handling contrast.  The LR historgram shows both in its display.  As well, the Epson V600 handles C-41 processed B&W film with Digital Ice – very little clean up done in post.  With one roll of the XP Super film left, I am tempted to get some more . . .

Canyon Oak

A tree, a sunny day, a canyon, a 1937 folding Welta Weltur camera, a colored filter, 120 film shot in6x4.5 film, Ilford film, a Schneider Kreuznach Xenar 2.8 80mm lens.  Such a delight to get back from the lab (even if I have to do a bit of cleaning up in LR)!

If you look closely, you will see there is blur in the image.  I finally figured out that the way I was pressing the exposure button was the fault.  I did it too quickly, and the result was a sort of little jerk.  Motion and blur.  That is why some pictures from this roll are sharper and others softer.  Interesting how you have to really think about things differently depending on the camera you are using.

In the Park

Another image from the roll of Ilford Super XP 400, a C-41 process black and white film.  Again, with the Welta Weltur from 1937.  And, once more, I am so impressed by the Xenar lens!

I took the Weltur out in a number of situations, using the Sunny 16 rule for the most part.  I expect I shot this at 1/250 as it was a bright, sunny day.  I also brought my light meter with me, but tried to guess before I measured.  I also think I may have used f/8.  The reason?  More light for the detail in the trunk.  Maybe I should write things down so I can see how things really work out – not just guess at how things work out.  Shouldn’t be too hard for 12 – 18 pictures!

Sage

This time around I remembered I had the reduction mask in my 1937 Welta Weltur camera.  I also used a yellow(ish) filter I have that slides over the lens.  I have never used it before, but I am glad I did as it made the plants a bit more differentiated.  In theory, I get how filters work, but when I try to remember, it just disappears from my brain.  One day it would be really nice to get that clearly imprinted in my memory!

Okay, that aside, I so enjoy making pictures with these old cameras.  When they hit the sweet spot, there is something so beautiful in the final image.  This one I cleaned up – threads, spots – but didn’t do too much more to it other than upping the contrast a bit.  I wanted the white sage flowers to pop against the background.  The filter helped, but so did digital post production.

I know some people who claim that digital post is not the same as a real dark room.  No, it’s not, but it is a lot easier to do the same things – and then some! – you would do in a traditional dark room.

Anyway, more to come, but perhaps only a couple as a lot of the images are a bit dicey as far as putting out in the public’s eye.  I scanned these with the Epson V600 scanner and the film is Ilford Super XP 400, which is a black and white that can be developed in C-41, which is the chemistry for color negative film.