Tag: Ektar 100

A Touch of Autumn

I just had to put this photo out there today.

I recently acquired a new-to-me Certo 6 camera, It has the legendary Carl Zeiss Tessar 80mm f2.8 lens.  The camera and lens date from around 1953 (give or take).  I shot this at f2.8 to check out the DOF and sharpness of the lens.  I’m amazed.  The Ektar 100 came through, too, with beautiful colors.

The Certo 6 is an odd folder in the sense that it has many features that other folding cameras (bellows cameras) of the same time era do not have.  Also, because current 120 film is thinner than that of the 50s, there is a potential for overlap of images – which I did not experience – and other quirks that need to be worked out.  I really like folders because they force you to slow down and think, as well as consider what you want to see on your film.

Square format is a compositional challenge as well.  As this is part of my first roll through the camera, composition was not of any real importance for me, but using the camera was.  For some reason I got only 9 out of 12 exposures on the film, but that is something I think I have figured out, and will run another roll of play film through the camera to check out my ideas . . . like I said, ya gotta think sometimes!

More to come.

Tree & Path

I’ve been doing a “silent 365” in black and white this year, but I want to make a comment here.  The camera which I used to take this picture is a 1935 box camera, a pseudo-TLR, the Voigtlander Brillant.  It’s an interesting camera – has a few quirks – but I was really pleased with the results.  This is an image taken on Ektar 100, 120mm, and converted to black and white for th is project.

 

Ssshh!

The World Beyond

On the rim of the Grand Canyon, the Colorado is a thin line leading to other worlds.

Originally I had mislabeled this as from Mesa Verde (that Southwest just all looks the same! – not!), and then looked again. That is one of the troubles with film . . . you have to use your memory – not your memory card – to recall where you were.

This is a small panorama using Kodak Ektar 100 and the Olympus XA4 point-n-shoot. And, it is the Grand Canyon with a snaking view of the Colorado far below and beyond.

Panorama at Shoshone Point

Panorama at Shoshone Point

Digital allows you to use the proverbial scattergun approach to imaging for a panorama . . . film requires a bit more thought through the viewfinder. Parts you think you have disappear, and you don’t know until you have left the place. Sometimes CS6 can fill in the gaps and other times you just have to crop, even if you have a different vision. Ah, well. Here, though, I was pretty pleased, though not perfectly pleased, with the results.