Tag: autumn

A Touch of Autumn

I just had to put this photo out there today.

I recently acquired a new-to-me Certo 6 camera, It has the legendary Carl Zeiss Tessar 80mm f2.8 lens.  The camera and lens date from around 1953 (give or take).  I shot this at f2.8 to check out the DOF and sharpness of the lens.  I’m amazed.  The Ektar 100 came through, too, with beautiful colors.

The Certo 6 is an odd folder in the sense that it has many features that other folding cameras (bellows cameras) of the same time era do not have.  Also, because current 120 film is thinner than that of the 50s, there is a potential for overlap of images – which I did not experience – and other quirks that need to be worked out.  I really like folders because they force you to slow down and think, as well as consider what you want to see on your film.

Square format is a compositional challenge as well.  As this is part of my first roll through the camera, composition was not of any real importance for me, but using the camera was.  For some reason I got only 9 out of 12 exposures on the film, but that is something I think I have figured out, and will run another roll of play film through the camera to check out my ideas . . . like I said, ya gotta think sometimes!

More to come.

Pin Oak Leaves

pin-oak-leaves

The Pin Oak is a tree indigenous to the parts of the US east of California – which means everywhere is east!  These are trees familiar to my childhood in the midwest and along the eastern seaboard, and I missed them forever once we moved to California.  There are oak trees in California, but they are adapted to a different climate, with much smaller leaves which don’t turn orange before falling.  Also, they are green year round, which is a blessing of color in a beige winter landscape.  And, they are as wonderful as the Pin Oak.  Yay, trees!

Autumn Morning

Autumn Morning

The other morning – the first of the time change – I headed out with my Nikon V3 (which took this picture), my 6×9 Voigtlander Bessa, and Olympus XA4.  I used the Nikon to consider exposure, as well as to catch a few for here.  The film will go in to the lab for processing later this week.

It was an incredible morning.  The Chumash Trail is a trail along a corridor of native oak trees, which overarch the entire trail, spots and splotches of sunshine breaking through.  The trees are hundreds of years old.  In some trees, small flocks of black and white birds would land, and all of a sudden it was as if it were raining acorns.  It was quite odd, but restful, like rain pattering on leaves.